Information about dementia for parents and grandparents (bitesize)

How To Help People With Dementia Live Independently

Daniel Esteve

How To Help People With Dementia Live Independently

17/10/2019




What I liked about this Help Sheet (link below): 

  • It reminds me that I am the hero of my own story (bear with me) and that I tend to organise my reality according to my world.  This is not too useful when I talk to my son.  So, I need to explain everything honestly according to his world.  This takes a bit of time.  When I get it wrong, I always regret it as my son always makes up a reality which is ten times worse than…reality. 
  • It reminds me that giving information to a child or grandparent is often more about listening than talking. 

 

Key points I extracted from this Help Sheet: 

  • Children will fill in the gaps if your story about their loved one’s illness has gaps.  Children are self-centric so they will fill the gaps with nonsense. 
  • Children will cope, but they will probably not start the conversation.    
  • Children are intensely worried that you might not cope.  They might not engage to give you an easier time.  They are often the only grown-ups around 
  • Children will respond emotionally.  It is important to verbalise this response (you feel guilty, angry etc…) and acknowledge this is the correct response.  It is correct as it is their response.  Just acknowledging this makes things easier.  Trying to convince them to think otherwise can often be counterproductive. 

 

The following texis taken directly from the help sheet: 

Questions young people may ask 

  • What’shappening to the person with dementia? 
  • Why is it happening?
  • Whycan’tmedicine make it better? 
  • Did I do something to make them sick?
  • Will I get it too?
  • Will they die?
  • What can I do to make it better?
  • Who will take care of me?
  • Why is everyone always so sad and angry?
  • Why can’t things be the way they were?

 

What I do: 

  • With my son, I take my time I do not try to explain the illness, I focus on explaining that our reactions are normal. 

More on this subject:

 

Author of this blog (Transparency):   

  • I work for CPR Global Tech and, for personal reasons, like many people, I have had to learn a lot about dementia the hard way.  As there is a natural forum on our website, it makes sense for me to share info here.  

 Source: https://www.dementia.org.au/files/helpsheets/Helpsheet-AboutDementia06-InformationForParentsAndGrandparents_english.pdf 


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Information about dementia for parents and grandparents (bitesize)

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by Daniel Esteve

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17/10/2019



What I liked about this Help Sheet (link below): 

  • It reminds me that I am the hero of my own story (bear with me) and that I tend to organise my reality according to my world.  This is not too useful when I talk to my son.  So, I need to explain everything honestly according to his world.  This takes a bit of time.  When I get it wrong, I always regret it as my son always makes up a reality which is ten times worse than…reality. 
  • It reminds me that giving information to a child or grandparent is often more about listening than talking. 

 

Key points I extracted from this Help Sheet: 

  • Children will fill in the gaps if your story about their loved one’s illness has gaps.  Children are self-centric so they will fill the gaps with nonsense. 
  • Children will cope, but they will probably not start the conversation.    
  • Children are intensely worried that you might not cope.  They might not engage to give you an easier time.  They are often the only grown-ups around 
  • Children will respond emotionally.  It is important to verbalise this response (you feel guilty, angry etc…) and acknowledge this is the correct response.  It is correct as it is their response.  Just acknowledging this makes things easier.  Trying to convince them to think otherwise can often be counterproductive. 

 

The following texis taken directly from the help sheet: 

Questions young people may ask 

  • What’shappening to the person with dementia? 
  • Why is it happening?
  • Whycan’tmedicine make it better? 
  • Did I do something to make them sick?
  • Will I get it too?
  • Will they die?
  • What can I do to make it better?
  • Who will take care of me?
  • Why is everyone always so sad and angry?
  • Why can’t things be the way they were?

 

What I do: 

  • With my son, I take my time I do not try to explain the illness, I focus on explaining that our reactions are normal. 

More on this subject:

 

Author of this blog (Transparency):   

  • I work for CPR Global Tech and, for personal reasons, like many people, I have had to learn a lot about dementia the hard way.  As there is a natural forum on our website, it makes sense for me to share info here.  

 Source: https://www.dementia.org.au/files/helpsheets/Helpsheet-AboutDementia06-InformationForParentsAndGrandparents_english.pdf 


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